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Los Angeles Orders Electric Buses from Proterra

Author: Mia Bevacqua   

Tired of buses blowing black smoke in your face? Then you may want to visit L.A. The Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) just ordered 25 Proterra e-buses to add to its growing fleet of electric vehicles.

Proterra Catalyst aims to reinvent public transportation

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LA Metro) is on mission to clean up the city. Already, the agency committed to going electric with its fleet of 2,200 buses by 2030. In August, it started by purchasing 95 electric buses from companies New Flyer and BYD.

And now, it's adding the Proterra e-bus to the mix. The 35-foot transport, called the Catalyst, is built as a pure-electric vehicle from the ground up.

It has two powertrain options: the Duopower and the Prodrive. The former has two independent 190 kW motors and the latter a single 220kW motor. Either option is paired with a 2-speed auto-shift EV gearbox and an advanced battery system. The top-of-the-line E2 Series model has a 440-kWh battery and a claimed MPGe of 25.8.

According to Proterra, this set up gives the Catalyst a normal driving range of up to 251 miles. Total plug-in charge time is between 1 and 3 hours, with a replenish time of about 5 minutes – faster than you can charge your Tesla.

LA Metro moves towards all-electric fleet

LADOT has ordered 25 of the buses to be delivered by 2019. Part of the funding will come from the Federal Transit Administration's Low or No Emission Vehicle Deployment Grants. The buses are predicted to save Los Angeles approximately of $11.2 million over their 12-year lifetime.

"Our goal is a 100 percent electric bus fleet – it's a quiet ride for our customers and cleaner air for our city," said Seleta Reynolds, LADOT's General Manager. "We know we can't achieve our vision without partners like Proterra, and we can't wait to see these buses on the street!"

Next time you catch the bus in L.A., it may not be a Blue Bird or Thomas built – it might be a Proterra.  


Sources: Charged EVs and Proterra 

Mia Bevacqua
Mia is an ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician, L1, L2 and L3 Advanced Level Specialist. She has over 12 years of experience in the automotive industry and a bachelor’s degree in automotive technology. These skills have been applied toward content writing, technical writing, inspections, consulting, automotive software engineering.
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