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Brembo Unveils a Breakthrough Electro-Mechanical Brake System Called ‘SENSIFY' That's Powered By AI

Brembo Unveils a Breakthrough Electro-Mechanical Brake System Called ‘SENSIFY' That's Powered By AI

Author: Eric Walz   

While vehicles have advanced tremendously over the past twenty years, there hasn't been much change in the design of standard hydraulic brakes, with the expection of the introduction of anti-lock brakes in the 1970's, which are now mandated on all new vehicles sold in the U.S.

Now performance brake supplier Brembo, unveiled its latest brake systems called "SENSIFY", which pairs its world-renowned brake components with the power of AI. The Italian company says its pioneering the development of intelligent braking technology that integrates the most advanced software.

SENSIFY combines Brembo's current product portfolio of brake calipers, discs and friction materials with digital technology and AI to create a flexible platform that includes software, predictive algorithms and data management to control a vehicle's brake system digitally. 

The brake system can intelligently adapt to any road or weather condition and offers independent control of all four wheels for safer driving. It configures the brake systems according to individual driving style. It allows drivers to customize their preferred braking response, such as pedal feel, force and travel.

The brake system also is capable of data collection to improve the driver experience and allows the system to be constantly updated, according to Brembo. SENSIFY works with any electric and internal combustion engine platform, including for compact cars, mid-size sedans, SUVs and commercial vehicles.

The SENSIFY brake setup on the vehicle includes electro-mechanical brake calipers which can instantly apply stopping force compared to a stand hydraulically-operated caliper. The electromechanical calipers operate more quickly compared to a hydraulic system.

The system itself is fully electronic. The hydraulic parts of the system are only used to apply braking force. A central CPU and various sensors monitor and control each wheel independently. The result is more precise car handling, increased performance and confidence, according to Brembo.

Braking systems today use hydraulically operated calipers that apply a fixed braking force to each wheel when a driver presses the brake pedal. If there is a loss of traction detected on any wheel, the anti-lock brake system (ABS) kicks in and relieves some hydraulic pressure on the wheel that is losing traction to maintain control.

The SENSIFY setup is a bit more complex. It uses two control units, one for the front and the other for the rear axle, to applies the desired braking force to each individual wheel. The two control units exchange data on the status of the four calipers, instantly applying the precise braking force to assure that braking pressure is applied evenly. This setup also reduces wear of the brake pads.

Brembo says that delivering finely tuned braking force to each individual wheel offers many advantages, including better stability because it prevents temporary losses of grip as a result of the ABS activating.

"Brembo is pushing the boundaries of what is possible with a braking system, opening up entirely new opportunities to drivers to improve their experience on the road and customize brake response to their driving style," says Daniele Schillaci, Brembo's Chief Executive Officer.  "t's another significant step forward in providing cutting-edge, innovative, intelligent and sustainable solutions to the automotive industry."

Schillaci told Automotive New Europe that Brembo was in talks with a major premium automaker to supply Sensify to its models beginning in 2024. He expects the SENSIFY system will become a "standard feature," on premium models by 2030.

SENSIFY is expected to be on the market by 2024.

Eric Walz
Eric Walz
Originally hailing from New Jersey, Eric is a automotive & technology reporter covering the high-tech industry here in Silicon Valley. He has over 15 years of automotive experience and a bachelors degree in computer science. These skills, combined with technical writing and news reporting, allows him to fully understand and identify new and innovative technologies in the auto industry and beyond. He has worked at Uber on self-driving cars and as a technical writer, helping people to understand and work with technology.
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