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Tesla Drops Standard Charging Cable for New EVs

Tesla Drops Standard Charging Cable for New EVs

Author: Vineeth Joel Patel   

The majority of all-electric vehicles on sale today come standard with a charging cable. Most automakers include a trickle charging cord that consumers get at no added cost to plug into a regular wall outlet. While these charging cords don't bring a lot of juice, they're incredibly helpful for owners that don't have a charging system installed at their house. Tesla, following in the footsteps of tech companies, has decided to stop giving buyers a standard charging cable with its EVs.

Tesla's Chargers Now Extra

The news first broke on Twitter when user Sawyer Merritt tweeted out the news with a link to a separate charging cable on the automaker's website. In a reply, Tesla CEO Elon Musk penned an explanation for the decision. "Usage statistics were super low, so seemed wasteful," tweeted Musk.

Of course, Twitter is filled with objecting and consenting views. Some people are happy with the decision, while others are dumbfounded that the luxury automaker is selling pricey electric cars without a standard charging cable. Up until 2022, every single electric car sold in the U.S. came with a standard charging cable of some kind. For the first few years, electric cars came with a 120-volt portable charging cord. More recently, we've seen automakers include cords that can handle up to 240-volts with a switch of a button as standard equipment. Before the new model year, Tesla offered its electric cars with a NEMA 5-5 adapter and a charging cable.

Now that Tesla isn't offering its vehicles with a standard charging cable, consumers that want to purchase one will have to do so separately. This can be done at the same time as purchasing a vehicle or after the car has been delivered. Unfortunately, it's not what we would call cheap, especially since it was standard earlier this year.

Shoppers will find two different charging cables on Tesla's website. The more affordable one is called the "Gen 2 Mobile Connector Bundle" and costs $275. It includes a NEMA 5-5 adapter, a 20-foot cable, and a storage bag. With this cable, consumers will see their EVs get up to 1.3 kW of power. Then, there's the more expensive $400 "Corded Mobile Connector" bundle. This one includes a NEMA 14-50 plug for shorter charge times.

This Will Become The New Norm

Tesla seems to have greatly underestimated the appeal of its standard charging cable, as both bundles are currently sold out on its website. Furthermore, Musk took to Twitter in the same chain to announce that prices for the mobile connector bundle will become more affordable based on feedback.

"Based on feedback received, we will drop mobile connector price to $200 & make it easy to order with car," tweeted Musk. Musk went on to that that he recommends "installing Tesla wall connector well before car arrives."

While recommending that consumers get a wall connector before an EV is sage advice, it's not possible for everyone. Consumers that live in apartments and those in areas without garages may have trouble getting a dedicated charging port installed in their homes. This is why most automakers offer some sort of standard charging cable with their vehicles. While it's not the fastest way to charge an EV, it's a great way for people in a pinch or those without the proper equipment.

Tesla isn't the only automaker that has stopped offering a standard charging cable. The 2022 Kia EV6 does not come with a charging cable from the dealership, either. 

Vineeth Joel Patel
Vineeth Joel Patel
Joel Patel has been covering all aspects of the automotive industry for four years as an editor and freelance writer for various websites. When it comes to cars, he enjoys covering the merger between technology and cars. In his spare time, Joel likes to watch baseball, work on his car, and try new foods
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